Goddess of the harvests, Annapurna – Chomrong

Pokhara

Bamboo

19th October, 2018

The die has been cast & there was no turning back. That was my feeling when I woke up prompted by the alarm clock. It was the day when we had to start our trek. All vehicular traffic would end and for the next week or so, we’d be on mountain trails. It wasn’t new to us, but it was, for the two little daughters in our team. They haven’t been through this before. Both the duration & altitude were going to be the highest they’d experience in their lives so far. Some members of the team already were out on the banks of the Fewa lake to enjoy their morning stroll.

IMG_20181019_062052
Fewa lake, Pokhara, pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

The overcast sky was a reminder of previous evening’s rains. It also meant that we won’t be treated with the views of the Annapurna range & their reflection on the lake waters. The clouds had it all covered but for a few glimpses peeping out here & there. I turned my attention to get myself & my daughter ready. Once that was done, it was time for breakfast. By then, rest of the members were back from their morning strolls. Once all assembled at the dining hall, breakfast was served. Some went for toast, bread & butter, while others stuck to parathas. Watermelon juice & black ginger tea complemented the food. By the time we finished the breakfast, our guide Raju & the porters arrived & so did the two jeeps that would carry us to Khumi, the point where we start walking from. As I went upstairs to my room for a final time, a quick glance to the horizon revealed a welcome scene. Clouds cleared up & beyond the ridge of the hill that lay in front, Mt Machchpuchchare (fish tail) was peeping out in its full morning glory!

P1150155
Mt Machchpuchchare (Fish tail), pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

A single view made all doubts go away. Suddenly, all seemed possible & easy. It’s amazing to know how the changing mood of nature can influence one’s state of mind. Our luggage made their way to the top of the vans. We divided ourselves equally between the two vans and started our journey. The road moved towards the outskirts of the Pokhara town. As we entered the highway, the entire stretch of it lay before us, which led straight towards the distant hills, beyond which, the snow-clad peaks of the Annapurna range bathed in bright morning sun. As the van moved ahead, the peaks only got nearer as if we were directly entering into their laps.

P1150156
En route Khumi, pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

My daughter got excited and she started filming a video with the mobile camera. As the van switched the roads, so did the angle of the snow peaks, but they never deprived us from their views. We crossed many junctions, small bridges and started to ascend the slopes. The peaks kept increasing their dimensions. The beautiful Modi khola (river, in Nepalese language) came thundering down through the slopes & the rocks in leaps & bounds. It’s water was azure, shining brightly in the morning sun. We crossed a bridge to reach the town Ulleri.

P1150162
Modi Khola, Ulleri, pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

Ulleri is the first place where our permits were checked. It is the first doorstep to enter the Annapurna Conservation Area Project, the protected area & the national park that covers the entire region in & around the Annapurna massif. Ulleri is also the place from where different trekking routes start. One such route is the one that goes to Poonhill. This route goes via Ghorepani, Tadapani and finally meets at Chomrong. Our route didn’t cover Poonhill and were to go via Khumi, Jhinudanda to converge with the Poonhill route at Chomrong. After which, the route was common. As the van crossed Ulleri, the paved road gave way to a dusty road with rocks and boulders. By the looks of it, it was a walking route, but somehow vehicles have started plying with the aim to reduce the walk. On our way, we crossed Birethanti, beyond which, we saw many trekkers embarking on foot. The road became increasingly bumpy & narrow. Human settlements & terraced fields reduced as they gave way to dense forests that started closing in. We kept thinking that the road would end anytime and we’d have to start on our feet, but the van kept moving on till it reached an open space which looked like a stand. There were a few shops. Rest of our group were already there and we joined them for tea. After tea, we strapped our backpacks, the porters evenly distributed the luggage & strapped their share on their respective backs. We took our walking sticks and after an opening photograph of the entire group, we hit the trail.

P1150174
Along the trail, pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

The path moved along the slopes amidst the forests. To start with, it wasn’t steep & we almost walked on level grounds. It was about 10.30 AM. While there was dense vegetation along the slopes we walked on, the slopes on the opposite side were covered with terraced fields that were interspersed with villages.

P1150215
Terraced fields, pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

In spite of the sunshine, it wasn’t very hot, mainly because we were walking under the shades of a canopy formed by hovering trees.

P1150188
En route Jhinudanda, pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

The Annapurna base camp trail is known to have forest cover for a majority of its sections and we were only going through the lowlands now. Trekking is always easier when you have tree cover as there’s no dearth of oxygen.

IMG_4902
En route Jhinudanda

Niladri insisted to walk alongside my daughter, a trend that would repeat for the entire trek and it provided the much-needed support. The age group to which my daughter belongs is one which makes her driven by moods. She has not yet reached the age to be able to ignore the physical exhaustion just by immersing herself into nature. Just going by the age, she is probably better equipped to cope with fatigue or breathlessness that usually accompanies trekking in the Himalayas, but she lacks one crucial trait, patience.

IMG_4898

It becomes critical when one goes through steep hikes seemingly unending. It is during these phases, one needs to constantly keep her engaged either by talking (at times, nonsense) or by diverting her focus to something other than the constantly hovering thought “how much more to go or I can’t bear it anymore’. Niladri is the best person equipped for it since, admittedly, I sometimes run out of patience, which can worsen the situation. So, I let them go ahead and followed, keeping a distance. Though I tried not to lose them from my sight, but off and on, they kept disappearing beyond the bends of the serpentine trail. Photography was another reason of such detachments.

P1150189
En route Jhinudanda, pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

After crossing a bend, I found them enjoying the serenity of a waterfall that crossed the trail. Other members of the group walked in separate groups in front or the rear. Rumi (Ranjan da’s daughter & my daughter’s cousin) was faring good, walking slowly at her own pace. After sometime, I found my daughter slowing down considerably with her walking increasingly interrupted by frequent halts. This wasn’t ideal. Though one doesn’t expect someone to sprint in the mountains, one needs to maintain a steady pace. It’s crucial to reach destination within time. I kept urging her not to halt frequently but Niladri asked me to go slow on pushing her. His logic was not to pressurize her, which could make matters worse. I felt, something wasn’t quite right and repeated probing revealed that she was facing stomach ache. Indigestion can be very depleting in treks, so something had to be done. We didn’t have much of a choice but to continue till the place of halt for lunch, Jhinudanda. It was already 12.30 and fortunately, we could see the village along the mountain slopes on the other banks of the river. But, what appears near, can prove far enough in these parts of the world. The trail started descending towards a metallic bridge,which was almost 1 km in length.

IMG_4903
En route Jhinudanda

It would take us to the other bank. Beyond that, I could see steps that we would need to ascend to reach Jhinudanda.

IMG_4913

It could prove difficult for my daughter to ascend the steps with stomach ache, but we had no choice. Both me & Niladri tried our best to keep her attention away from the ailment & she responded reasonably well. Hiking the stairs wasn’t easy for her and we had to halt after every 8-10. I was aware that more stairs awaited us after Jhinu. In fact, the entire trail from Jhinu to Chomrong involved ascending steps (created by placing carefully cut out rocks). There were around a thousand to ascend. For a moment, I was worried about how my daughter would cope with them, especially, after lunch, but I removed such thoughts & decided to solve the imminent one, which was to address her stomach ache.

P1150233
Jhinudanda, pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

The lodge at Jhinu was big by local standards. It had a big covered dining hall which is where we sat and gave our orders for lunch. I restricted my diet to curd & rice and did the same for my daughter. But first of all, I searched for a toilet for my daughter. Fortunately, it was near and it was neat & spacious (a rare find in these remote areas). After returning from toilet she expressed some desire to eat, which was a good sign. We would be staying at Jhinu on our way back, which would be in another six days. Others enjoyed Nepalese meals & chicken curry, which raised interest of my daughter as well, but we stuck to our diet to keep it light on the first day. After lunch, we strapped our bags again and moved out of the lodge. Very soon we were greeted with the steps that would take us to Chomrong.

IMG_4916
En route Chomrong

It did appear daunting at the first sight as the stairs seemed never-ending that went upwards turning through multiple bends only to ascend further up. With our stomachs full, it did prove difficult to ascend them initially. However, I knew, it was just a matter of getting used to it. As before, I let Niladri move along with my daughter & I followed them. For the initial phase, she was doing good, but things started to change after a few bends of turn. As her legs started tiring, fatigue set in and her patience started wearing out. After every few steps, she would halt to ask about the distance remaining to be covered. I had to be careful to set her expectations right. There wasn’t any point to quote low, so I said “there is still some way to go, be patient”. I also urged her not to stop frequently since clouds were making their way into the valley having eclipsed the sun already.

P1150238
En route Chomrong, pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

A development I didn’t like but there wasn’t anything I could do. I just hoped it didn’t rain as that would make matters worse. No one wants wet clothes ad there aren’t many that we were carrying & they don’t dry sufficiently quick in this moist weather. Visibility reduced with dense clouds and fog held the sway. With height, my daughter started getting more tired and her halts increased. I was now in a catch 22 situation. Tiredness meant she couldn’t walk any faster, but slow speed implied increasing the possibilities of facing rain before reaching the destination. Both Niladri & I tried to make her understand. But she continued her rhetoric “I can’t walk, my legs are paining, how much more to go?”. It was proving difficult to make her understand that “not walking” isn’t really an option. In order to get out of this situation, one has to reach the next destination & for that, walking was the only way out. At times we had to mix considerate words with mild admonishment (at the same time being careful about not overdoing it to an extent to demoralize her). It was a tough balancing act at such altitudes to handle a child of little over nine years. After a few more turns, she almost gave up and started crying inconsolably.

P1150266
En route Chomrong, pic courtesy – Dhananjoy De

I felt helpless and looked up to Niladri, who was equally at bay. He came up with a wild suggestion (which only he could do) to carry her on his back. I vehemently denied it. He kept insisting but I stuck to my stand. No matter what happens, we shouldn’t get into these acts. Firstly, it was an unnecessary risk to put oneself into. Secondly, I didn’t want to set unrealistic expectations that, when in such trouble, someone could always carry her through. Looking upwards, I saw one of our porters coming down the slopes. They already reached Chomrong and after keeping our luggage, came down to see if anyone needed help. This is something they always do & I keep getting overwhelmed by their acts. This time, he offered to carry my daughter on his back and my reply to him was  same as what I gave to Niladri. But guide Raju (who was coming up in the rear) insisted I agree. Since there wasn’t much of the trail left, he thought it to be reasonable, especially, considering that rain was imminent. I reluctantly agreed and the Porter carried my daughter on his back while we followed behind. After crossing another few bends, I found my daughter sitting on a rock and a few steps ahead, lay the lodge of Chomrong, our destination for the day. The trail ahead was gradual and we quickly covered it to reach the dining hall.

As soon as we got the keys of our rooms, I headed towards it. My first job was to change the clothes of my daughter, which were wet, not due to rain, but sweat. Since she was carrying a bit cough, the idea was to put on dry clothes as soon as possible. As soon as I did it, she was prompt to go to the bed and went into deep sleep. She reached the threshold of tiredness and sleep overtook her. Just as I ventured out of the room with the hope to hang the wet clothes to dry them up, rains poured in heavily. We were just in time to reach the lodge. Given that it was the first day of trek, our legs were very tired. Evening settled in gradually as daylight gave way to darkness. Dinner was served at 7.30 PM. I had to wake my daughter up who was deep asleep. After dinner, some of the members went to a nearby village to witness the celebrations of Dussera (or Dasai, as it is called in Nepal). I concentrated to identify the set of clothing for us for the next day. After that, it was time to go under the blankets. We were sleeping at 2700 m.

Pokhara

Bamboo

One thought on “Goddess of the harvests, Annapurna – Chomrong”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s